Every man wants to look fresh after a shave. Nobody likes a rough or bumpy chin especially when going on a date. However, not everyone comes out fresh after a shave.

 

Razor burn and razor bumps are often mistaken for one another. However, they are considered to be two separate conditions.

 

While razor burn is a skin irritation caused by shaving, razor bumps are the result of ingrown hairs.

 

Razor bumps are a common skin condition that occurs as a result of shaving. The condition is more common in men and usually occurs on the face.

 

 

Ingrown hair occurs when hair that has been shaved or removed by other means, such as plucking or waxing, grows back at an angle. This causes it to turn into the skin.

 

People with coarse or curly hair tend to be most affected by the ingrown hair, although it can affect people of any hair type.
Symptoms of ingrown hair include:

red bumps
swelling
rash
tenderness
itchiness
In some cases, ingrown hairs can cause the hair follicle to become infected, which is a condition known as folliculitis.

 

With razor bumps and the skin irritation that accompanies it, prevention is better than cure The very best way to deal with it is to avoid getting them in the first place.

 

For a start, try to shave as infrequently as possible. On those occasions when you have little choice but to shave, following these simple instructions will reduce the likelihood of creating the ingrown hairs which lead to the bumps.

 

Wet your skin with hot water.

 

 

Apply a generous amount of shaving cream or unscented soap to your skin.

 

Only use new, extra-sharp single blade razors of the highest quality.

Shave in the direction your hair grows.

 

Close your pores back up immediately after you’ve finished by applying a cold cloth to your face.


As a precaution, if you still have razor bumps from the last time you shaved you should really reconsider just how important it is that you shave that day. Not only will shaving over older bumps likely extend their life and potentially lead to scarring, shaving over the razor-burned skin is usually very painful.

 

Treating Razor Bumps

Depending on the severity of the bumps, various treatments can sometimes make a huge difference to skin compromised by razor bumps

 

Here are a few tips and treatments commonly employed to manage the condition once the bumps have already formed.

 

1. Don’t scratch them.

Yes, as unbearable as it may seem sometimes, scratching itchy razor bumps only serves to spread bacteria around, including whatever germs you have on your hands at that moment. For this reason, it’s wise to avoid touching your razor bumps in general, let alone scratching them.

 

2. Apply anti-bacterial creams and ointments.

Apply gels or creams that contain lidocaine and/or bacitracin to the affected area, both when treatment is required and as a preventative measure.

 

 

 

Lidocaine is found in many aftershave products because it prevents itching and irritation, while bacitracin kills bacteria. Hydrocortisone and other antibacterial creams can help lessen inflammation and redness. Retin-A cream is also effective in this capacity.

 

3. Try Natural Remedies

There are many home remedies that claim to get rid of ingrown hairs and razor bumps if they do occur.

Try the following natural remedies for a difference:

ALOE VERA

 
Aloe Vera is a traditional remedy for helping soothe irritated skin. If you have an Aloe Vera plant at home, then snip off the tip of a leaf and squeeze the gel inside directly onto the skin to get rid of razor burn. You can also buy Aloe Vera gel, but be careful to choose a brand that contains no artificial colours or fragrances. One step further – choose a shave cream that contains Aloe Vera that provides the soothing benefits.

 

HOT COMPRESS
You can make a hot compress by soaking cotton wool in hot water and pressing it gently against your skin. The heat opens up your pores, allowing the trapped hair to become free.

LEMON JUICE


Lemon juice is naturally acidic and so helps to stop bacteria from colonizing ingrown hair follicles. Apply lemon juice to razor burn to help reduce redness and prevent infection.

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